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Prayer and Fervency, Part 4 (TPMD Bus 2 – #676)

11 Dec

POEM: “Let My Prayer be as Incense” by William Gadsby

Our prayer motivator passage from the Word of God today is Psalm 142:1 which reads: “I cried unto the Lord with my voice; with my voice unto the Lord did I make my supplication.”

Our featured prayer motivator quote is from Andrew Murray. He said, “The Lord gave the wonderful promise of the free use of His Name with the Father in conjunction with doing His works. The disciple who lives only for Jesus’ work and Kingdom, for His will and honor, will be given the power to appropriate the promise. Anyone grasping the promise only when he wants something very special for himself will be disappointed, because he is making Jesus the servant of his own comfort. But whoever wants to pray the effective prayer of faith because he needs it for the work of the Master will learn it, because he has made himself the servant of his Lord’s interests.”

My personal encouragement for you today is this: You can pray to God anytime and anywhere. God will help you to pray with your family every day. I know He will, because in over twenty-five years of marriage, I have never missed a day in prayer and family devotions with my own family, and it is the single most important reason why we are still together and thriving in the work of the Lord. Prayer is where the power is.

Our prayer motivator devotional today is titled “PRAYER AND FERVENCY” part 4 from the book, “Necessity of Prayer” by E.M. Bounds.

E.M. Bounds goes on to say:

God once declared, by the mouth of a brave prophet, to a king who, at one time, had been true to God, but, by the incoming of success and material prosperity, had lost his faith, the following message: “The eyes of the Lord run to and fro throughout the whole earth, to shew Himself strong in the behalf of them whose heart is perfect toward Him. Herein hast thou done foolishly; therefore, from henceforth thou shalt have wars.”

God had heard Asa’s prayer in early life, but disaster came and trouble was sent, because he had given up the life of prayer and simple faith.

In Romans 15:30, we have the word, “strive,” occurring, in the request which Paul made for prayerful cooperation.

In Colossians 4:12, we have the same word, but translated differently: “Epaphras always labouring fervently for you in prayer.”

Paul charged the Romans to “strive together with him in prayer,” that is, to help him in his struggle of prayer. The word means to enter into a contest, to fight against adversaries. It means, moreover, to engage with fervent zeal to endeavor to obtain.

These recorded instances of the exercise and reward of faith, cause us easily to see that, in almost every instance, faith was blended with trust until it is not too much to say that the former was swallowed up in the latter. It is hard to properly distinguish the specific activities of these two qualities, faith and trust. But there is a point, beyond all peradventure, at which faith is relieved of its burden, so to speak; where trust comes along and says: “You have done your part, the rest is mine!”

In the incident of the barren fig tree, our Lord transfers the marvelous power of faith to His disciples. To their exclamation, “How soon is the fig tree withered away!” He said:
“If ye have faith, and doubt not, ye shall not only do this which is done to the fig tree, but also if ye shall say unto this mountain, Be thou removed, and be thou cast into the sea; it shall be done. And all things, whatsoever ye shall ask in prayer, believing, ye shall receive.”

When a Christian believer attains to faith of such magnificent proportions as these, he steps into the realm of implicit trust. He stands without a tremor on the apex of his spiritual outreaching. He has attained faith’s veritable top stone which is unswerving, unalterable, unalienable trust in the power of the living God.

 
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Posted by on December 11, 2015 in Prayer Motivator Devotionals

 

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