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Prayer, Character, and Conduct, Part 2 (TPMD Bus 2 – #688)

30 Jan

POEM: “As For Me” by Deborah Ann Belka

Our prayer motivator passage from the Word of God today is Isaiah 38:5 which reads: “Go, and say to Hezekiah, Thus saith the Lord, the God of David thy father, I have heard thy prayer, I have seen thy tears: behold, I will add unto thy days fifteen years.”

Our featured prayer motivator quote is from Jennifer Maggio. She said, “It is a great privilege to cry out to our Heavenly Father when our heart is overwhelmed and know that He is our safe refuge. He sees those times when we are exhausted and feel you we cannot press on. He sees when we have lost sleep over a difficult decision. And He is faithful to send someone at the perfect time who is honored to pray just for you.”

My personal encouragement for you today is this: You will never “find” time to pray, you must choose to “make” time to pray. The devil will try to keep you back from praying by bringing things to your mind that you may need to do but that can wait until later to be done. Don’t let the devil talk you out of praying to God.

Our prayer motivator devotional today is titled “PRAYER AND CHARACTER AND CONDUCT” part 2 from the book, “Necessity of Prayer” by E.M. Bounds.

In the study of Paul’s Epistles, there is one thing which stands out, clearly and unmistakably — the insistence on holiness of heart, and righteousness of life. Paul does not seek, so much, to promote what is termed “personal work,” nor is the leading theme of his letters deeds of charity. It is the condition of the human heart and the blamelessness of the personal life, which form the burden of the writings of St. Paul.

Elsewhere in the Scriptures, too, it is character and conduct which are made preeminent. The Christian religion deals with men who are devoid of spiritual character, and unholy in life, and aims so to change them, that they become holy in heart and righteous in life. It aims to change bad men into good men; it deals with inward badness, and works to change it into inward goodness. And it is just here where prayer enters and demonstrates its wonderful efficacy and fruit. Prayer drives toward this specific end. In fact, without prayer, no such supernatural change in moral character, can ever be effected. For the change from badness to goodness is not wrought “by works of righteousness which we have done,” but according to God’s mercy, which saves us “by the washing of regeneration.” And this marvellous change is brought to pass through earnest, persistent, faithful prayer. Any alleged form of Christianity, which does not effect this change in the hearts of men, is a delusion and a snare.

The office of prayer is to change the character and conduct of men, and in countless instances, has been wrought by prayer. At this point, prayer, by its credentials, has proved its divinity. And just as it is the office of prayer to effect this, so it is the prime work of the Church to take hold of evil men and make them good. Its mission is to change human nature, to change character, influence behaviour, to revolutionize conduct. The Church is presumed to be righteous, and should be engaged in turning men to righteousness. The Church is God’s manufactory on earth, and its primary duty is to create and foster righteousness of character. This is its very first business. Primarily, its work is not to acquire members, nor amass numbers, nor aim at money-getting, nor engage in deeds of charity and works of mercy, but to produce righteousness of character, and purity of the outward life.

 
1 Comment

Posted by on January 30, 2016 in Prayer Motivator Devotionals

 

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One response to “Prayer, Character, and Conduct, Part 2 (TPMD Bus 2 – #688)

  1. Ricardo James

    January 30, 2016 at 8:05 am

    Awesome word!

     

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