Prayer is Putting God to Work, Part 3 (The Prayer Motivator Devotional #738)


Our prayer motivator passage from the Word of God today is Psalm 55:16-17 which reads: “As for me, I will call upon God; and the LORD shall save me. Evening, and morning, and at noon, will I pray, and cry aloud: and he shall hear my voice.”

Our featured prayer motivator quote is from David Jeremiah. He said, “Our prayers are strengthened when we know God is listening and that He is faithful.”

My personal encouragement for you today is this: Here are four benefits that I have personally received from prayer to God, and that I know you can receive as well. (1) Prayer to God will deliver you from temptation, evil, and sin. (2) Prayer to God will protect you from hurt, harm, and danger. (3) Prayer to God will deliver you out of bad situations and trouble. And (4) Prayer to God will cause God to do things for you “exceeding abundantly above all that you ask or think.”

Our prayer motivator devotional today is titled “PRAYER IS PUTTING GOD TO WORK” part 3 from the book, “The Weapon of Prayer” by E.M. Bounds.

E.M. Bounds goes on to say:

Prayer, with its antecedents and attendants, is the one and only condition of the final triumph of the Gospel. It is the one and only condition which honours the Father and glorifies the Son. Little and poor praying has weakened Christ’s power on earth, postponed the glorious results of His reign, and retired God from His sovereignty.

Prayer puts God’s work in His hands, and keeps it there. It looks to Him constantly and depends on Him implicitly to further His own cause. Prayer is but faith resting in, acting with, and leaning on and obeying God. This is why God loves it so well, why He puts all power into its hands, and why He so highly esteems men of prayer.

Every movement for the advancement of the Gospel must be created by and inspired by prayer. In all these movements of God, prayer precedes and attends as an invariable and necessary condition.

In this relation, God makes prayer identical in force and power with Himself and says to those on earth who pray: “You are on the earth to carry on My cause. I am in heaven, the Lord of all, the Maker of all, the Holy One of all. Now whatever you need for My cause, ask Me and I will do it. Shape the future by your prayers, and all that you need for present supplies, ask Me. I made heaven and earth, and all things in them. Ask largely. Open thy mouth wide, and I will fill it. It is My work which you are doing. It concerns My cause. Be prompt and full in praying. Do not abate your asking, and I will not wince nor abate in My giving.”

Advertisements

Prayer is Putting God to Work, Part 1 (The Prayer Motivator Devotional #736)


Our prayer motivator passage from the Word of God today is Psalm 5:2 which reads: “Hearken unto the voice of my cry, my King, and my God: for unto thee will I pray.”

Our featured prayer motivator quote is: “Prayer reminds you that you are not God.”

My personal encouragement for you today is this: Families are in need of a great amount of intercession. Even if your marriage and family seem strong right now, seek out those families in your community who are on the rocks and make it your mission to pray for them daily.

Our prayer motivator devotional today is titled “PRAYER IS PUTTING GOD TO WORK” part 1 from the book, “The Weapon of Prayer” by E.M. Bounds.

The assertion voiced in the title given this chapter is but another way of declaring that God has of His own motion placed Himself under the law of prayer, and has obligated Himself to answer the prayers of men. He has ordained prayer as a means whereby He will do things through men as they pray, which He would not otherwise do. Prayer is a specific divine appointment, an ordinance of heaven, whereby God purposes to carry out His gracious designs on earth and to execute and make efficient the plan of salvation.

When we say that prayer puts God to work, it is simply to say that man has it in his power by prayer to move God to work in His own way among men, in which way He would not work if prayer was not made. Thus while prayer moves God to work, at the same time God puts prayer to work. As God has ordained prayer, and as prayer has no existence separate from men, but involves men, then logically prayer is the one force which puts God to work in earth’s affairs through men and their prayers.

Let these fundamental truths concerning God and prayer be kept in mind in all allusions to prayer, and in all our reading of the incidents of prayer in the Scriptures.

If prayer puts God to work on earth, then, by the same token, prayerlessness rules God out of the world’s affairs, and prevents Him from working. And if prayer moves God to work in this world’s affairs, then prayerlessness excludes God from everything concerning men, and leaves man on earth the mere creature of circumstances, at the mercy of blind fate or without help of any kind from God. It leaves man in this world with its tremendous responsibilities and its difficult problems, and with all of its sorrows, burdens and afflictions, without any God at all. In reality the denial of prayer is a denial of God Himself, for God and prayer are so inseparable that they can never be divorced.

Prayer and Vigilance, Part 6 (TPMD Bus 2 – #712)


POEM: “Have You Considered My Prayer” by Kathleen Higham

Our prayer motivator passage from the Word of God today is Jonah 4:2 which reads: “And he prayed unto the Lord, and said, I pray thee, O Lord, was not this my saying, when I was yet in my country? Therefore I fled before unto Tarshish: for I knew that thou art a gracious God, and merciful, slow to anger, and of great kindness, and repentest thee of the evil.”

Our featured prayer motivator quote is from Andrew Murray. He said, “The Master says (and the experience of His people has confirmed) that men of strong faith are men of much prayer.”

My personal encouragement for you today is this: There is great power through prayer to God. And there are great benefits from God in prayer. You will find as you trail through life that you will need God, and prayer invites God to work in, through, and for your life.

Our prayer motivator devotional today is titled “PRAYER AND VIGILANCE” part 6 from the book, “Necessity of Prayer” by E.M. Bounds.

In the New Testament, there are three different words, which are translated “watch.” The first means “absence of sleep,” and implies a wakeful frame of mind, as opposed to listlessness; it is an enjoinder to keep awake, circumspect, attentive, constant, vigilant. The second word means “fully awake,” — a state induced by some rousing effort, which faculty excited to attention and interest, active, cautious, lest through carelessness or indolence, some destructive calamity should suddenly evolve. The third word means “to be calm and collected in spirit,” dispassionate, untouched by slumberous or beclouding influences, a wariness against all pitfalls and beguilements.

All three definitions are used by St. Paul. Two of them are employed in connection with prayer. Watchfulness intensified, is a requisite for prayer. Watchfulness must guard and cover the whole spiritual man, and fit him for prayer. Everything resembling unpreparedness or non-vigilance, is death to prayer.

In Ephesians, Paul gives prominence to the duty of constant watchfulness, “Watching thereunto with all perseverance and supplication.” Watch, he says, watch, WATCH! “And what I say unto you, I say unto all, Watch.”

Sleepless wakefulness is the price one must pay for victory over his spiritual foes. Rest assured that the devil never falls asleep. He is ever “walking about, seeking whom he may devour.” Just as a shepherd must never be careless and unwatchful lest the wolf devour his sheep, so the Christian soldier must ever have his eyes wide open, implying his possession of a spirit which neither slumbers nor grows careless. The inseparable companions and safeguards of prayer are vigilance, watchfulness, and a mounted guard. In writing to the Colossians Paul brackets these inseparable qualities together: “Continue in prayer,” he enjoins, “and watch in the same, with thanksgiving.”

Prayer and Vigilance, Part 5 (TPMD Bus 2 – #711)


POEM: “Jesus, Kneel Beside Me” by Allen E. Cross

Our prayer motivator passage from the Word of God today is Jonah 4:2 which reads: “And he prayed unto the Lord, and said, I pray thee, O Lord, was not this my saying, when I was yet in my country? Therefore I fled before unto Tarshish: for I knew that thou art a gracious God, and merciful, slow to anger, and of great kindness, and repentest thee of the evil.”

Our featured prayer motivator quote is from Bill Thrasher. He said, “We might not be able to speak in any pulpit we choose, but we certainly can pray for any pulpit. People may not be willing to listen to us, but they cannot stop us from praying for them. We can only be in one place at one time, but our prayers can cover more than one continent. What an awesome opportunity to realize that you can cooperate with God and lift the spirit of an individual half a world away from you.”

My personal encouragement for you today is this: The only way to get true wisdom is by simply praying and asking God for it. It is a free gift of the grace of God, as is your soul’s salvation.

Our prayer motivator devotional today is titled “PRAYER AND VIGILANCE” part 5 from the book, “Necessity of Prayer” by E.M. Bounds.

The soldier-prayer must reflect its profound concern for the success and well-being of the whole army. The battle is not altogether a personal matter; victory cannot be achieved for self, alone. There is a sense, in which the entire army of Christ is involved. The cause of God, His saints, their woes and trials, their duties and crosses, all should find a voice and a pleader in the Christian soldier, when he prays. He dare not limit his praying to himself. Nothing dries up spiritual secretions so certainly and completely; nothing poisons the fountain of spiritual life so effectively; nothing acts in such deadly fashion, as selfish praying.

Note carefully that the Christian’s armour will avail him nothing, unless prayer be added. This is the pivot, the connecting link of the armour of God. This holds it together, and renders it effective. God’s true soldier plans his campaigns, arranges his battle-forces, and conducts his conflicts, with prayer. It is all important and absolutely essential to victory, that prayer should so impregnate the life that every breath will be a petition, every sigh a supplication. The Christian soldier must needs be always fighting. He should, of sheer necessity, be always praying.

The Christian soldier is compelled to constant picket-duty. He must always be on his guard. He is faced by a foe who never sleeps, who is always alert, and ever prepared to take advantage of the fortunes of war. Watchfulness is a cardinal principle with Christ’s warrior, “watch and pray,” forever sounding in his ears. He cannot dare to be asleep at his post. Such a lapse brings him not only under the displeasure of the Captain of his salvation, but exposes him to added danger. Watchfulness, therefore, imperatively constitutes the duty of the soldier of the Lord.

Prayer and Vigilance, Part 4 (TPMD Bus 2 – #710)

POEM: “If You’ll Take Time For Prayer”

Our prayer motivator passage from the Word of God today is Jonah 2:7 which reads: “When my soul fainted within me I remembered the Lord: and my prayer came in unto thee, into thine holy temple.”

Our featured prayer motivator quote is from E.M. Bounds. He said, “Those who know God the best are the richest and most powerful in prayer. Little acquaintance with God, and strangeness and coldness to Him, make prayer a rare and feeble thing.”

My personal encouragement for you today is this: There is a special blessing that comes when you pray for other people. Make it a point to pray for your family members, your friends, your coworkers, your pastor, and your church. Prayer will make all the difference in these relationships.

Our prayer motivator devotional today is titled “PRAYER AND VIGILANCE” part 4 from the book, “Necessity of Prayer” by E.M. Bounds.

In his Epistle to the Romans, Paul indicates the nature of his soldier-life, giving us some views of the kind of praying needed for such a career. He writes:

“Now I beseech you, brethren, for the Lord Jesus Christ’s sake, and for the love of the Spirit, that ye strive together with me in your prayers to God for me, that I may be delivered from them that do not believe in Judaea.”

Paul had foes in Judaea — foes who beset and opposed him in the form of “unbelieving men” and this, added to other weighty reasons, led him to urge the Roman Christians to “strive with him in prayer.” That word “strive” indicated wrestling, the putting forth of great effort. This is the kind of effort, and this the sort of spirit, which must possess the Christian soldier.

Here is a great soldier, a captain-general, in the great struggle, faced by malignant forces who seek his ruin. His force is well-nigh spent. What reinforcements can he count on? What can give help and bring success to a warrior in such a pressing emergency? It is a critical moment in the conflict. What force can be added to the energy of his own prayers? The answer is — in the prayers of others, even the prayers of his brethren who were at Rome. These, he believes, will bring him additional aid, so that he can win his fight, overcome his adversaries, and, ultimately, prevail.

The Christian soldier is to pray at all seasons, and under all circumstances. His praying must be arranged so as to cover his times of peace as well as his hours of active conflict. It must be available in his marching and his fighting. Prayer must diffuse all effort, impregnate all ventures, decide all issues. The Christian soldier must be as intense in his praying as in his fighting, for his victories will depend very much more on his praying than on his fighting. Fervent supplication must be added to steady resolve, prayer and supplication must supplement the armour of God. The Holy Spirit must aid the supplication with His own strenuous plea. And the soldier must pray in the Spirit. In this, as in other forms of warfare, eternal vigilance is the price of victory; and thus, watchfulness and persistent perseverance, must mark the every activity of the Christian warrior.

Prayer and Vigilance, Part 3 (TPMD Bus 2 – #709)


POEM: “Father, Hear the Prayer We Offer,” by L. M. Willis

Our prayer motivator passage from the Word of God today is Daniel 9:3-6 which reads: “And I set my face unto the Lord God, to seek by prayer and supplications, with fasting, and sackcloth, and ashes…”

Our featured prayer motivator quote is from Samuel Chadwick. He said, “Great grief prays with great earnestness. Prayer is not a collection of balanced phrases; it is the pouring out of the soul. What is love if it be not fiery? What are prayers if the heart be not ablaze? They are the battles of the soul. In them men wrestle with principalities and powers…The prayer that prevails is not the work of lips and fingertips. It is the cry of a broken heart and the travail of a stricken soul.”

My personal encouragement for you today is this: You will never “find” time to pray, you must choose to “make” time to pray. The devil will try to keep you back from praying by bringing things to your mind that you may need to do but that can wait until later to be done. Don’t let the devil talk you out of praying to God.

Our prayer motivator devotional today is titled “PRAYER AND VIGILANCE” part 3 from the book, “Necessity of Prayer” by E.M. Bounds.

How comprehensive, pointed and striking are all Paul’s directions to the Christian soldier, who is bent on thwarting the devil and saving his soul alive! First of all, he must possess a clear idea of the character of the life on which he has entered. Then, he must know something of his foes — the adversaries of his immortal soul — their strength, their skill, their malignity. Knowing, therefore, something of the character of the enemy, and realizing the need of preparation to overcome them, he is prepared to hear the Apostle’s decisive conclusion:

“Finally, my brethren, be strong in the Lord, and in he power of His might. Put on the whole armour of God, that ye may be able to stand against the wiles of the devil. Wherefore, take unto you the whole armour of God, that ye may be able to stand in the evil day, and having done all, to stand.”

All these directions end in a climax; and that climax is prayer. How can the brave warrior for Christ be made braver still? How can the strong soldier be made stronger still? How can the victorious battler be made still more victorious? Here are Paul’s explicit directions to that end:

“Praying always with all prayer and supplication in the Spirit, and watching thereunto with all perseverance and supplication for all saints.”

Prayer, and more prayer, adds to the fighting qualities and the more certain victories of God’s good fighting-men. The power of prayer is most forceful on the battle-field amid the din and strife of the conflict. Paul was preeminently a soldier of the Cross. For him, life was no flowery bed of ease. He was no dress-parade, holiday soldier, whose only business was to don a uniform on set occasions. His was a life of intense conflict, the facing of many adversaries, the exercise of unsleeping vigilance and constant effort. And, at its close — in sight of the end — we hear him chanting his final song of victory, a I have fought a good fight,” and reading between the lines, we see that he is more than conqueror!

Prayer and Vigilance, Part 2 (TPMD Bus 2 – #708)

POEM: “Behold Us, Lord, a Little Space” by John Ellerton

Our prayer motivator passage from the Word of God today is Daniel 9:3-6 which reads: “And I set my face unto the Lord God, to seek by prayer and supplications, with fasting, and sackcloth, and ashes: And I prayed unto the Lord my God, and made my confession, and said, O Lord, the great and dreadful God, keeping the covenant and mercy to them that love him, and to them that keep his commandments; We have sinned, and have committed iniquity, and have done wickedly, and have rebelled, even by departing from thy precepts and from thy judgments: Neither have we hearkened unto thy servants the prophets, which spake in thy name to our kings, our princes, and our fathers, and to all the people of the land.”

Our featured prayer motivator quote is from Charles Stanley. He said, “The essence of meditation is a period of time set aside to contemplate the Lord, listen to Him, and allow Him to permeate our spirits.”

My personal encouragement for you today is this: Here are three benefits that I have personally received from prayer to God, and that I know you can receive as well. (1) Prayer to God can cause your ministry to flourish beyond your wildest imaginations. (2) Prayer to God will help you to be a better witness for the Lord. And (3) Prayer to God will help you have good relationships with other people.

Our prayer motivator devotional today is titled “PRAYER AND VIGILANCE” part 2 from the book, “Necessity of Prayer” by E.M. Bounds.

What a misconception many people have of the Christian life! How little the average church member appears to know of the character of the conflict, and of its demands upon him! How ignorant he seems to be of the enemies he must encounter, if he engage to serve God faithfully and so succeed in getting to heaven and receive the crown of life! He seems scarcely to realize that the world, the flesh and the devil will oppose his onward march, and will defeat him utterly, unless he give himself to constant vigilance and unceasing prayer.

The Christian soldier wrestles not against flesh and blood, but against spiritual wickedness in high places. Or, as the Scriptural margin reads, “wicked spirits in high places.” What a fearful array of forces are set against him who would make his way through the wilderness of this world to the portals of the Celestial City! It is no surprise, therefore, to find Paul, who understood the character of the Christian life so well, and who was so thoroughly informed as to the malignity and number of the foes, which the disciple of the Lord must encounter, carefully and plainly urging him to “put on the whole armour of God,” and “to pray with all prayer and supplication in the Spirit.” Wise, with a great wisdom, would the present generation be if all professors of our faith could be induced to realize this all-important and vital truth, which is so absolutely indispensable to a successful Christian life.

It is just at this point in much present-day Christian profession, that one may find its greatest defect. There is little, or nothing, of the soldier element in it. The discipline, self-denial, spirit of hardship, determination, so prominent in and belonging to the military life, are, one and all, largely wanting. Yet the Christian life is warfare, all the way.